Rituals at Tibetan Buddhist Dharma Centers
Buddhist Philosophy

Rituals at Tibetan Buddhist Dharma Centers

Rituals at Tibetan Buddhist Dharma Centers can delight, intrigue, and/or confuse newcomers. Here we offer some brief guidelines for the curious onlooker.

Sangha Updates

Losar: Tibetan New Year

Losar literally means ‘New Year’ in Tibetan. Tibetans celebrated a New Year harvest festival prior to the introduction of Buddhism into Tibet. Many elements of the ancient harvest festival remain, however Buddhist rituals easily incorporated these ancient practices.

Lha Bab Düchen
Buddhist Philosophy

Celebrating Lha Bab Düchen

Lha Bab Düchen (lha babs dus chen) in Tibetan translates as, ‘The Festival of the Descent from Heaven.’ We celebrate this great event on the 22nd

Buddhist Philosophy

Being Patient and Farsighted and Enduring Hardship

As social beings, we humans learn from those around us. And because we don’t have fixed, unchanging solidity as beings, we make choices. We can choose to follow our innate goodness. If we associate with loving, kind, and open-hearted people, we will naturally develop those qualities. When we acknowledge our basic goodness, we lean toward virtue and surround ourselves with others who share that view.

Buddhist Philosophy

Speaking Moderately and in a Gentle Way

As social beings, we humans learn from those around us. And because we don’t have fixed, unchanging solidity as beings, we make choices. We can choose to follow our innate goodness. If we associate with loving, kind, and open-hearted people, we will naturally develop those qualities. When we acknowledge our basic goodness, we lean toward virtue and surround ourselves with others who share that view.

Buddhist Philosophy

Not Being Influenced by Evil Companions

As social beings, we humans learn from those around us. And because we don’t have fixed, unchanging solidity as beings, we make choices. We can choose to follow our innate goodness. If we associate with loving, kind, and open-hearted people, we will naturally develop those qualities. When we acknowledge our basic goodness, we lean toward virtue and surround ourselves with others who share that view.

Buddhist Philosophy

Having Little Jealousy

Jealousy sneaks up on us in many ways and it can be a tricky mental state to isolate. The Tibetan term (phrag dog) is a translation from the Sanskrit word Īrṣyā. According to the Mahayana Abhidharma, jealousy is one of the subsidiary unwholesome mental factors. The Indian and Tibetan words encompass two separate English terms: jealousy and envy. Jealousy derives from the negative emotion of anger or ill will. Envy also may manifest as resentment or anger, but it may also be mixed with attachment or greed.

Buddhist Philosophy

Repaying Debts on Time and Not Cheating With Weights and Measures

Although some readers might believe Buddhism and business have little to do with one another, history shows us a different story. The Buddha himself taught merchants and rulers, and members of the merchant class aided in spreading the teachings throughout Asia. Buddhist teachers and rulers recognized that laypeople need to take or give loans and to exchange commercial goods. But in doing so, we can be expected to conform to standards of fairness, honesty, and compassion in our interactions.

Buddhist Philosophy

Repaying Those Who Have Previously Shown Kindness

Societal Human Values Series #11 Tibetan Emperor Songtsen Gampo, (Srong-brtsan-sgam-po), reigned 629-650 CE. Among his many achievements, he promoted a moral code known as the Sixteen Principles of