Nine Yanas

Preliminary Practices from the Lamé Tukdrup Barché Künsel: Going for Refuge

In this teaching, generously sponsored by Samye’s Indonesian Sangha, Drupla Sonam Tsering provides instruction and commentary to the The Four Foundations or Ngöndro practices of the Tukdrup Barché Künsel. Drupla will be teaching on the refuge portion of the Concise Ngöndro from the Tukdrup Barché Künsel. This teaching is in Tibetan with English and Indonesian translation.

The Two Pramāṇas: An Overview

In the previous essay, we discussed the study of knowledge (“epistemology”) in general terms. The central question of epistemology is: how do we know things?

Multiplying

Multiplying Effects: Five Ways of Multiplying Merit

Practitioners should take advantage of all opportunities to increase the accumulation of merit easily and swiftly. We need to know how to magnify our virtues. Phakchok Rinpoche reminds us regularly that we need to consistently accumulate merit.

The Buddhist Science of Logic

One of the most important terms in Buddhism is avidyā or “ignorance,” a Sanskrit word that literally means “not knowing,” from one of the many

Preparing to Die, Learning to Live

In “Preparing to Die, Learning to Live,” Tulku Migmar discusses how preparing to die is fundamentally about how we live. When we live with aims like accumulation of wealth, and we have a lot of attachments, facing death can be quite difficult. Death comes for everyone—anyone who is born will die. And the only thing that we bring with us is our Dharma practice.

Repeated Placement: Once Again Resting the Mind

Repeated Placement is the third stage of our calm abiding meditation.  In shamatha meditation, our practice proceeds gradually so that we are able to quickly recognize when our attention wanders off.  Here, Tulku Migmar Tsering explains how repeated placement works.Repeated placement means that as soon as we notice we are distracted we bring the mind back.  Here Tulku explains that if we allow our wandering to go on, it makes the mind very “heavy”.  And then it is harder for us to be mindful and to meditate.  So he suggests that we learn to do this in three seconds–don’t forget our focus.

Continuous Placement in Meditation: Bring Back the Mind

Continuous placement, or establishing continuity, is the second stage of calm abiding meditation.  When we practice calm-abiding or shamatha meditation, we’re gradually retraining our minds. When we practice continuous placement we don’t have more thoughts than we had before.  In fact, we are making a big step in managing our minds.  We are noticing when the mind wanders and how many thoughts we have.  Normally we don’t pay any attention to that process.