Impermanence

Preparing to Die, Learning to Live

In “Preparing to Die, Learning to Live,” Tulku Migmar discusses how preparing to die is fundamentally about how we live. When we live with aims like accumulation of wealth, and we have a lot of attachments, facing death can be quite difficult. Death comes for everyone—anyone who is born will die. And the only thing that we bring with us is our Dharma practice.

Busy Laziness

Busy Laziness

These days we are all so busy that we often don’t take time to consider how constant doing affects our minds. And we might be surprised to know that in the Buddhist tradition, busyness represents a type of spiritual laziness. How can that be? If we’re doing all the time, how can we be lazy?


Contemplate Impermanence

Contemplate Impermanence: How Do We Follow That Instruction?

We know that we ourselves will eventually die. We know, and yet … are we really taking these teachings to heart as the Buddha and the teachers encourage us to do? Do we truly believe that this could be our last Dharma talk or meditation session? Have we become bored with these reflections?

Renunciation

Renunciation: Wake-up Call

If we are serious about the Buddhist path, then we can and should reflect on the fundamentals.  Here, Phakchok Rinpoche reminds us to reflect on impermanence and on renunciation.

Trusting Karma

Trusting Karma

Trusting karma is something that many of us struggle with in our practice. But are we clear about what karma really means? Here, Phakchok Rinpoche reminds us that the Sanskrit word karma means “action.” We create karma when we act with our physical body or when we speak. However, it may not be so obvious that we create karma when we think as well.

Practitioner Phakchok Rinpoche to Lazy Phakchok Rinpoche

I am at the moment in Gomde New York. Hope you all are keeping well and that you are keeping up with your practice. I came across a short audio teaching on the bardos by Kyabje Dudjom Rinpoche earlier today and it sent a strong reminder for practicing.

Guru Devotion in Vajrayāna

Guru Devotion is the key to Vajrayāna practice, Phakchok Rinpoche explains.  When we practice this tradition, we see the guru as the Buddha.  This contrasts with the approach of the other vehicles. 

Letter from My Guru

I would like to share this message with you all for today’s Guru Rinpoche Day: My son, you need to understand the dharma that I taught you. That is the easy part. The difficult part is the practice. And the more difficult part is to maintain the practice. Maintain means to carry on the practice whether you are in the mountain or in the city.