Holistic Living

Being Patient and Farsighted and Enduring Hardship

As social beings, we humans learn from those around us. And because we don’t have fixed, unchanging solidity as beings, we make choices. We can choose to follow our innate goodness. If we associate with loving, kind, and open-hearted people, we will naturally develop those qualities. When we acknowledge our basic goodness, we lean toward virtue and surround ourselves with others who share that view.

Speaking Moderately and in a Gentle Way

As social beings, we humans learn from those around us. And because we don’t have fixed, unchanging solidity as beings, we make choices. We can choose to follow our innate goodness. If we associate with loving, kind, and open-hearted people, we will naturally develop those qualities. When we acknowledge our basic goodness, we lean toward virtue and surround ourselves with others who share that view.

Not Being Influenced by Evil Companions

As social beings, we humans learn from those around us. And because we don’t have fixed, unchanging solidity as beings, we make choices. We can choose to follow our innate goodness. If we associate with loving, kind, and open-hearted people, we will naturally develop those qualities. When we acknowledge our basic goodness, we lean toward virtue and surround ourselves with others who share that view.

Having Little Jealousy

Jealousy sneaks up on us in many ways and it can be a tricky mental state to isolate. The Tibetan term (phrag dog) is a translation from the Sanskrit word Īrṣyā. According to the Mahayana Abhidharma, jealousy is one of the subsidiary unwholesome mental factors. The Indian and Tibetan words encompass two separate English terms: jealousy and envy. Jealousy derives from the negative emotion of anger or ill will. Envy also may manifest as resentment or anger, but it may also be mixed with attachment or greed.

Repaying Debts on Time and Not Cheating With Weights and Measures

Although some readers might believe Buddhism and business have little to do with one another, history shows us a different story. The Buddha himself taught merchants and rulers, and members of the merchant class aided in spreading the teachings throughout Asia. Buddhist teachers and rulers recognized that laypeople need to take or give loans and to exchange commercial goods. But in doing so, we can be expected to conform to standards of fairness, honesty, and compassion in our interactions.

Tibetan Medicine Basics

Tibetan Medicine Tools for Trying Times

During these stressful times, Tibetan Medicine may offer us some tools for bringing our body and mind into balance. Our sangha member and Dakini Doctor, Dr. Tawni Tidwell presented a video program at the Rubin Museum of Art in NYC in conjunction with the Center for Healthy Minds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in April 2020.Tawni shares very simple and practical practices that we can immediately implement into our daily routines. In these short videos, she gives us tools that are easy to follow and help us refresh our bodies and mind.

Anxiety and Meditation on Campus

Anxiety and Meditation on Campus—Then and Now

Anxiety is widely reported to be the number one psychological challenge among students today, and in a recent survey, 97% of students reported technological distractions are a problem both inside and beyond the classroom. Any faculty member can confirm this: to give a single anecdote, I was sitting at one of our public events behind a young woman who had brought her laptop, and she had nine live social media feeds open at once in just one app. More in others. Did she hear anything at the event where she was sitting? It seems unlikely. Many students find themselves in a constant state of distraction.